Home » Seattle Soup Swap

Seattle Soup Swap

Hello, welcome! I know you’re here to read about soup swap, but stick around – it’s more than just soup at Nerd’s Eye View. You might also enjoy:

or, who knows, maybe not. There’s stuff about cooking seafood, local and international adventures, ukulele days and nights… take a look. And welcome, future soup swappers! Be sure to check out Soup Swap, too.

 

 

An array of soup

My friend Knox is quite the genius at times. He hosted the first soup swap several years back. Soup swap, for those not in the know, is the culinary equivalent of tossing your keys in the bowl and ending up in the neighbor’s bathtub the next morning, wondering what why you had that last Manhattan.

Actually, that’s not it at all. Here are this year’s instructions.

Suffice to say, the rules are pretty simple.

You bring six 1 quart containers of frozen soup of one kind. We will then draw numbers and take turns picking out different soup. You will then leave with six 1 quart containers of different soup. Bring whatever soup you like to cook best. For the vegetarians among you, we don’t set rules on type of soup to bring, though usually there’s more than a few really delicious veggie options, but be forewarned it could be that you end up with 4 veggie soups and two meat soups you’ll have to share with your meat eating pals. Of course, when you do this, you will be regaled as a hero.

The most common question is “Can you have a proxy?” The answer is yes, of course, you just have to figure out how to get your soup to where it needs to be. And then figure who’s going to draw numbers for you. Proxies pick last in order.

Carrie presents

This year’s soup swap was a smashing success, as always. I have a freezer bursting with homemade soupy goodness and so do 12 other happy Seattle residents.

The instructions for arriving with your soup are clear – but a tip for you. Most soup recipes don’t make quite enough soup. Double the recipe when prepping for soup swap.

There’s excellent protocol for the distribution of the soup as well. Follow these guidelines.

  1. Gather the soup (and the chefs) in a central location. Admire the quantity and variety.
  2. Go around the room and have each chef describe his or her creation.
  3. Place numbers in a hat equal in number to the particpants. Each person picks a number.
  4. Number 1 picks one soup, and so on, until everyone has had a go. Repeat until all the soup is gone.
  5. Proxy pickers (for those who sent soup with a friend but did not attend) go last. You need not be present to win, but you do need to be present to get first crack at selecting.

Lonnie gets the door prizeThis year’s soup swap included door prizes – wooden spoons! – for first soup picked and last soup picked. Paul and Michelle brought accessories for their soup – goldfish crackers, those sneaky devils! – thus raising the stakes for next year. I totally blew it by bringing an untested soup; there was little interest in it, though it surprisingly, it did not end up as the last soup picked.

Paul and Michelle raise the stakesWhile you can make a dinner party out of soup swap, the best swaps I’ve attended are wine and cheese type affairs. Guests arrive, snack a little, drink a little, swap soup, and get the hell out. Less, stress for the hosts and easy to do on a school night.

On the menu at Seattle households for the next few weeks around town?

  • Thai chicken soup
  • Spicy tomato with goldfish crackers
  • Roasted garlic, kale, and white bean minestrone
  • Creamy almond soup
  • Veggie chili
  • Ranger Dan’s dal
  • Holiday butternut squash soup
  • Classic potato cheddar
  • …and several more that I can’t remember right now.

Read about last year’s Boston Soup Swap here. And there are a few photos from last night’s swap here.

Why not make soup swap a winter tradition in your home town?

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18 Responses to “Seattle Soup Swap”

  1. dougdo says:

    Wow, what a great idea. I love cooking and eating soup on these rainy cold days. I’ll have to start the Great Canadian Soup Swap in Vancouver when I get back from Costa Rica.

  2. Michelle says:

    Hey you, great summary and great pics.

    Makes me wanna do it all over again!

    Paul and I have another great plan – stay tuned.

  3. Knox says:

    Pam,

    I am a genius ALL the time.

  4. Marilyn says:

    Now THIS is an idea even a non-cook like me can get behind…brilliant! The folks at work want to have a cookie swap…the idea being to go home for holiday break with SIX DOZEN Xmas cookies. I ask you, do J and I really need to be eating SIX DOZEN COOKIES?! I rest my case.

  5. Adrienne says:

    Being souplovers who blog about nothing but soup, this is right up our alley. We’d thought about a soup party, but a winter soup swap is an even better reason for a get-together. Can’t wait to have our own! Thanks so much for sharing!

  6. b says:

    Frickin’ brilliant idea! I’m already figuring out what other types of food I can swap. I wonder if anyone would do a chicken swap?!

    Thanks!

  7. [...] If you want to know how to host a soup swap, there are general guidelines here. If you do host a January 23rd soup swap, please drop me a line so I can let the other soup swappers know who’s participating and add your city to the press release. And you, you overseas people? You know who you are. We’d love to be able to call it International Soup Swap day, so if you can round up your neighbors and get them in on the swapping, do let me know. [...]

  8. [...] If you want to know how to host a soup swap, there are general guidelines here. If you do host a January 23rd soup swap, please drop me a line so I can let the other soup swappers know who’s participating and add your city to the press release. And you, you overseas people? You know who you are. We’d love to be able to call it International Soup Swap Day. You know what to do. [...]

  9. [...] The First (Inter)National Soup Swap Day is scheduled for January 23, 2007. There will be soup swaps occurring in Seattle (here’s the last one), Boston (here’s the last one), and Washington, DC (new location). If you are not in any of these cities, or want to participate with your own crowd, set up your own soup swap (here’s how) and tell us about it. If you are in one of these three cities but have not participated before, let us know and we will add you to the invite list. [...]

  10. This is the most awesome idea I’ve heard of today, and I’ve spent my day exposed to some creative, idea-filled people. Rock on!

  11. utenzi says:

    Megan, over at Not Martha, sent me to see you and your great post about a Soup Swap. Your friend Knox deserves a medal for this concept.

  12. [...] However, I had a delightful evening. Andy, Kgap, and Lis came over for a soup swap evening, except that only two of us (not me) actually made soup to swap.  I provided dinner, and swapped the remaining cornbread muffins.  It was a grand time — we ate hummus and drank wine and talked about our feelings.  And made butt hair jokes.  I’m so blessed to have such friends. [...]

  13. [...] Seattle Soup Swap – Nerd’s Eye View Michelle, are you thinking what I’m thinking? Anyone interested in a SoupSwap should get in contact with me over the next couple of weeks. (tags: food goodfood friends cooking recipes) [...]

  14. [...] love the idea of doing a dinner or soup swap. Maybe someone will organize one for us here (not it!). The jist is this: A bunch of people gather [...]

  15. [...] Nerd’s Eye View attended a soup swap.  Each guest made six frozen portions of a homemade soup.  The hosts then drew numbers, and each guest took turns picking a container to take home until each had six.  The host even had prizes for the first soup selected and the last. [...]

  16. [...] Swapper Pam, back from Austria, posted some pictures and has a fine review here. If you are looking for how we do it, check out my previous post on the Boston Soup [...]

  17. [...] 2009 by meevans77 Ever done a soup swap?  I don’t know these people, but stumbled upon this blog a few years ago.  It was the first time I had heard of a soup swap & it sounded like an [...]

  18. [...] Swapper Pam, back from Austria, posted some pictures and has a fine review here. If you are looking for how we do it, check out my previous post on the Boston Soup [...]

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